The National Institute for Computational Sciences

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Using the Darter supercomputer at the National Institute for Computational Sciences, a team of researchers is modeling the biophysics of red blood cells to understand their behavior in the spleen, with the aim of finding cures to diseases.

Eighty graduate students and post-docs representing 28 nationalities and five continents participated in the Fifth Annual International Summer School on High-performance Computing, June 1–6, in Budapest, Hungary. The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) was a joint sponsor.

The National Institute for Computational Sciences has embarked on its second year as host to an SC14 Student Cluster Competition team.

Research supported by high-performance computing resources from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) has provided insight into the behavior of air pollutants.

A team of scientists from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is using supercomputing to develop technologies for the virtual high-throughput screening of potential medicines. This type of work could lead to a dramatic paradigm shift in the pharmaceutical industry.

The 2014 Computational Science for Undergraduate Research Experiences (CSURE) summer internship program is underway. It is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin using computational methods.

Free workshops on data-intensive computing and GPGPU programming will be presented June 16–20 and June 30–July on the campus of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and at locations around the country via two-way high-definition video. Seating is limited, so if you're interested, you should sign up right away.

The list and schedule of speakers for the XSEDE14 Conference from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, July 13–18, in Atlanta, has been finalized and made available. Experts from a variety of fields of science, technology, education, and cyberinfrastructure are slated to speak.

High-performance computing is assisting research to make carbon fiber commercial production sustainable and cost-effective.

Kraken enabled a research team from Temple University to apply quantum mechanics in the study of water.

Since we're viewing our galaxy from the inside and thus can't get the entire picture from observation, knowledge of its formation history has been elusive, but supercomputer simulations such as the ones done using Kraken and Nautilus at NICS could help overcome our limitations and unravel the mysteries.

Simulations performed using the Kraken supercomputer took into account how rocks in the earth's surface would absorb energy and affect ground motion speed during a severe earthquake in Southern California. The research broke ground in a path to more-accurate earthquake planning scenarios.

Decommissioned as of April 30, 2014, the Kraken supercomputer leaves a legacy as the "go-to" flagship resource in the National Science Foundation's TeraGrid and later, the eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

The NICS-managed Kraken supercomputer is one of the resources that researchers are using to simulate cosmic events known as tidal disruptions, in which a black hole devours a star and emits a beacon to the far reaches of the universe.

Research supported by advanced digital resources from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) has created the basis for the development of better surfactants, compounds with a variety of important and essential roles in everyday life.

Troy Baer, NICS senior high-performance computing system administrator, was honored on April 1 with the Adaptive Computing Lifetime Achievement award at the second-annual Adaptie Awards ceremony during the Moabcon 2014 conference in Park City, Utah.

The Computational Science for Undergraduate Research Experiences summer program from the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences has opened new doors for 2013 participants Ciara Thompson and Nyalia Lui as they further their education.

A research team from Princeton University is using high-performance computing resources from NICS to investigate the explosive mechanism within core-collapse supernovae.

The Darter supercomputer last year assisted the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) in meeting a crucial milestone, simulation of the Watts Bar nuclear reactor.

NICS is contributing expertise and high-performance computing resources to a new program from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) aimed at promoting multidisciplinary collaborations between the scientific and industrial communities.

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